Sunday, February 19, 2017

ARISS Equipment on SpaceX Launch


From AMSAT-bb and Frank Bauer, KA3HDO, ARISS International Chair, AMSAT-NA V.P. for Human Spaceflight Programs

Included as part of today's successful launch of the SpaceX Dragon vehicle to ISS is an ARISS Ericsson 2 meter VHF radio.  This radio will replace the Ericsson radio that failed a few months ago.  The VHF radio is used for school group contacts and amateur packet radio in the Columbus module.  Once the Dragon vehicle is berthed to ISS, the Ericsson will be unstowed and, at some point, installed in Columbus, replacing the UHF radio that is now supporting APRS packet and some school contacts.

Our thanks to SpaceX on an outstanding and historic flight from Kennedy Space Center's Launch Pad 39A, where many Space Shuttle missions  and nearly all the Apollo moon missions were launched.  We also would like to thank our ARISS benefactors-NASA and CASIS, the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space.  And, of course, our amateur radio long-time sponsors-our national amateur radio organizations around the world, including the American Radio Relay League (ARRL) in the US, and our international AMSAT organizations, including AMSAT-NA.

 Before closing, I want to let you know that ARISS is making great progress on the development of the new interoperable radio system that we hope to use to replace our aging radio infrastructure in the Columbus module and the Service module.  The hard (and expensive) part of this effort is just beginning, with testing and human certification on the horizon.  We thank all that have donated to the cause thus far.  We hope you continue to help ARISS move forward through your support, including your volunteer time and talent and, of course, financial contributions through the AMSAT web site
donate button.


ARLK014 Keplerian data

SB KEP @ ARL $ARLK014
ARLK014 Keplerian data

ZCZC SK14
QST de W1AW 
Keplerian Bulletin 14  ARLK014
From ARRL Headquarters
Newington, CT  February 17, 2017
To all radio amateurs

SB KEP ARL ARLK014
ARLK014 Keplerian data

Special thanks to AMSAT-NA (AMSAT.ORG) for the following Keplerian data.

Decode 2-line elsets with the following key:
1 AAAAAU 00  0  0 BBBBB.BBBBBBBB  .CCCCCCCC  00000-0  00000-0 0  DDDZ
2 AAAAA EEE.EEEE FFF.FFFF GGGGGGG HHH.HHHH III.IIII JJ.JJJJJJJJKKKKKZ
KEY: A-CATALOGNUM B-EPOCHTIME C-DECAY D-ELSETNUM E-INCLINATION F-RAAN
G-ECCENTRICITY H-ARGPERIGEE I-MNANOM J-MNMOTION K-ORBITNUM Z-CHECKSUM

0 AO-07
1 07530U 74089B   17048.54485324 -.00000027  00000-0  11012-3 0  9996
2 07530 101.6147  19.6647 0011873 193.1015 282.8105 12.53625507933861
0 FO-29
1 24278U 96046B   17048.52028426 -.00000029  00000-0  94200-5 0  9999
2 24278  98.5802 307.5985 0349411 287.4599  68.8635 13.53074670 12690
0 ISS
1 25544U 98067A   17048.57667564  .00002324  00000-0  42005-4 0  9992
2 25544  51.6427 274.5669 0007026 199.9470 246.7513 15.54380521 43155
0 SO-50
1 27607U 02058C   17047.68296191 +.00000026 +00000-0 +24332-4 0  9994
2 27607 064.5558 133.7910 0038431 151.4993 208.8222 14.75283224761200
0 CO-55
1 27844U 03031E   17047.96759627 +.00000047 +00000-0 +41022-4 0  9996
2 27844 098.6921 058.7128 0009312 341.3859 018.6977 14.22014919707196
0 RS-22
1 27939U 03042A   17048.57282559  .00000154  00000-0  36142-4 0  9992
2 27939  97.9190 197.3049 0011851 242.9572 184.9949 14.66521440715782
0 CO-58
1 28895U 05043F   17048.17301387  .00000169  00000-0  41409-4 0  9992
2 28895  97.8493 216.0951 0017402 159.4901 200.7004 14.63342080602935
0 CO-65
1 32785U 08021C   17048.53260924  .00000247  00000-0  32735-4 0  9994
2 32785  97.5786  78.2007 0012690 198.6093 161.4662 14.87796256477107
0 COMPASS 1
1 32787U 08021E   17048.14338400  .00000250  00000-0  29646-4 0  9999
2 32787  97.5747  85.9413 0012919 172.3803 187.7616 14.92427988477596
0 DO-64
1 32789U 08021G   17048.38692779  .00001872  00000-0  13822-3 0  9998
2 32789  97.5743 109.0839 0013799 145.6021 214.6101 15.04390027478852
0 RS-30
1 32953U 08025A   17048.19991592  .00000010  00000-0  38933-5 0  9994
2 32953  82.5052 314.2798 0018422 185.1845 174.9047 12.43074591396511
0 KKS-1
1 33499U 09002H   17047.95064676 +.00000124 +00000-0 +26391-4 0  9993
2 33499 098.3159 209.9132 0009958 043.3904 316.8086 14.75134427433218
0 AO-71
1 37854U 11061E   17048.42716085  .00001383  00000-0  82241-4 0  9995
2 37854 101.7085 221.1033 0168865  69.2849 292.6370 15.03616441288935
0 AO-73
1 39444U 13066AE  17047.90851547 +.00000265 +00000-0 +39680-4 0  9991
2 39444 097.6483 096.7835 0057303 301.1982 058.3622 14.81331219173216
0 UKUBE 1
1 40074U 14037F   17048.22916127  .00000324  00000-0  46580-4 0  9996
2 40074  98.3366 157.8581 0005894  82.8454 277.3432 14.83374864141398
0 XW-2A
1 40903U 15049E   17048.50442614  .00002491  00000-0  68635-4 0  9999
2 40903  97.4325  72.7157 0014535 342.4699  17.6042 15.38036162 79249
0 XW-2C
1 40906U 15049H   17048.51378785  .00000861  00000-0  50599-4 0  9999
2 40906  97.4554  56.4184 0013718 269.1024  90.8636 15.14258981 78121
0 XW-2F
1 40910U 15049M   17048.50546882  .00001331  00000-0  74468-4 0  9992
2 40910  97.4546  56.7053 0013974 265.1243  94.8394 15.15095289 78034
0 IO-86
1 40931U 15052B   17048.34831449  .00000731  00000-0  12817-4 0  9990
2 40931   6.0025   7.2114 0013730 348.8294  11.1712 14.76511442 75223
0 AO-85
1 40967U 15058D   17047.10786537  .00000189  00000-0  41066-4 0 04018
2 40967 064.7742 226.1193 0175925 122.7752 239.0441 14.75314216059255

Keplerian bulletins are transmitted twice weekly from W1AW.  The next scheduled transmission of these data will be Tuesday, February  21, 2017, at 2330z on Baudot and BPSK31.
NNNN
/EX

And the latest hamsat

NAYIF
1 17002U 17002A  17046.17824931 0.00000000  00000-0  00000-0 0  9993
2 17002  97.5521 107.5843 0004848 278.6481 296.8511 15.21991390    01

AMSAT News Service ANS-050

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and information service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building, launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it. Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to: ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* Nayif-1 Launched
* Satellite Operators on the Road
* Amateur Radio on the International Space Station Contact Opportunity
* RadFXsat-2 Receives IARU Frequency Coordination
* 14th Annual CubeSat Developers Workshop
* BY70-1 Re-entry

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-050.01
ANS-050 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 050.01
From AMSAT HQ KENSINGTON, MD.
DATE February 19, 2017
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-050.01

Nayif-1 Launched

The Indian Space Agency ISRO successfully launched the amateur radio satellite Nayif-1 along with 103 other satellites, a record for a single launch. The PSLV-C37 lifted off from the Satish Dhawan Space Centre, Sriharikota, Andhra Pradesh at 03:58 UT on Wednesday, February 15, 2017.

Nayif-1 started transmitting about an hour after launch and radio amateurs in the west of the USA reported the first signals. The first frame of data received at the Data Warehouse was from Christy Hunter KB6LTY. Telemetry data was also received by WA6FWF, KA7FVV, WC7V, NC7V, K6FW, KE7QPV, WA9ONY, W5PFG,  KK6AYK.

Ken Eaton GW1FKY reports he received his first frames of data when the satellite came in range of the UK at 10:07 UT.

The satellite looks to be in perfect health and it was placed in autonomous mode before the end of the first day in orbit. Just like FUNcube-1, this mode has the spacecraft sending high power telemetry when in sunlight and with the  SSB/CW transponder active when in eclipse. Already many contacts have been made through the transponder. As expected, the frequency stability of this spacecraft is much better than its predecessors.

A new post-launch set of TLE’s has been issued by the launch authority and it can be downloaded from http://amsat-nl.org/download/NAYIF_TLE.txt

Please note that these numbers are not based on JSpOC observations so we do not yet have a valid catalog number.

During the Launch and Early Operation phase (LEOP) of the mission, the Nayif-1 command team have been headquartered at the American University of Sharjah Ground station in the United Arab Emirates. They have been very grateful for all the telemetry received from around the world. It has proven to be immensely useful to the team in checking that the spacecraft is functioning correctly.

Our world-wide network has greatly impressed the many professionals that have been watching our activities. Already more than 100 ground stations are submitting data to the Nayif Data Warehouse. Please continue uploading the data as this will further enhance our knowledge about the spacecraft and the space environment through which it is traveling at 7.6 km/s.

The Nayif-1 Data Warehouse has been updated and now includes the Whole Orbit, High Resolution graphs and the upload ranking. It also includes telemetry details from the ADCS sub-system – this is called the iMTQ and is capable of actively magnetorquing. Over the coming days, we will be further
tweaking the warehouse, so bear with us if it is unavailable for short periods of time.

Background Nayif-1 has been developed by the Mohammed bin Rashid Space Centre (MBRSC) and
American University of Sharjah (AUS). The UAE’s first Nanosatellite was developed by Emirati engineering students from AUS under the supervision of a team of engineers and specialists from MBRSC within the framework of a partnership between the two entities, aiming to provide hands-on
experience to engineering students on satellite manufacturing.

The spacecraft includes a U/V linear transponder and telemetry transmitter. It employs enhanced oscillator circuitry and includes an active attitude determination and control system.

The operating frequencies for the spacecraft are:

Telemetry
145.940 MHz using 1k2 BPSK to the FUNcube standard.

SSB/CW Transponder
Uplink on 435.045 – 435.015 MHz
Downlink on 145.960 – 145.990 MHz

The Nayif-1 Telemetry Dashboard can be downloaded from
http://download.funcube.org.uk/nayif-1_Dashboard_1039_Installer.msi

Guidance notes
https://funcubetest2.files.wordpress.com/2017/02/nayif-1_dashboard_notes_release-1-0b.pdf

A file to test that the Dashboard and Warehouse configuration are working correctly
http://download.funcube.org.uk/nayif1_testfile.funcubebin

Nayif-1 Data Warehouse http://data.amsat-uk.org/nayif1/

[ANS thanks AMSAT-UK for the above information]

---------------------------------------------------------------------

Satellite Operators on the Road

ZF, CAYMAN ISLANDS. Scott/KA9P and Ron/W9XS will be active as ZF2SC and ZF2FB, respectively, from the Cayman Islands between February 22-28th. Activity will be on 40/30/20/17/15 meters and the satellites. Operations will typically be CW, with a KX1 or KX3, and Buddipole beams or verticals. QSL via their home callsigns or LoTW.

6E, MEXICO. A group of Ham Radio operators from Southern Mexico will be operating from some Mayan archaeological sites from the Mexican States of Yucatan, Campeche, Tabasco, Chiapas and Quintana Roo, using the special callsign 6E3MAYA between March 18-21st. Activity is to commemorate the Spring Equinox which is so important for the Mayan culture. Activity will be on 80-6 meters on CW, SSB, the satellites and the Digital modes. QSL via XE3N.

C6, BAHAMAS (IOTA Op). Operators John/M0IDA, Rob/M0VFC and Steve/M1ACB hope to be active as C6APY from Little Harbour Cay, Berry Islands (NA-054, WW Locator FL15do). They will fly into the Bahamas on March 2nd, but it will take them a couple of days to get to the island, so they hope to be active around March 4th - but this is very much weather dependent, as is the whole operation. They will fly back to the UK on March 12th, which means they will need to de-rig on the 10th or 11th, again varying according to the weather. Operation probably won't be 24/7 - they will do as much operating as they can, but eating and sleeping is back on the boat, there's only three of them, and they will probably want to go for the occasional swim as well. They will be running up to three stations simultaneously, all Elecraft K3s at 100W. They will be generator powered and have to carry
the full week's fuel with them on the boat, hence no amps. They are expecting that most QSOs will be on 40-15 meters; they will monitor the higher HF bands as well and may venture on to 10/12m if propagation favors them; similarly they may throw up an 80m dipole, but don't expect to do very much, if anything, there. There will definitely be CW (op M0VFC) and SSB (ops M0IDA and M1ACB); they may also do some data if time permits. They should be active on some satellite passes with hand-held antennas: the FM birds will only cover parts of the USA, and not EU, so they will
attempt some FO-29 passes as well. They are not satellite experts though, so be patient with them. QSL is via M0OXO's OQRS system. They will upload the logs to ClubLog and LoTW regularly throughout the trip, assuming all the kit plays nicely. Watch Twitter for any other updates:
https://twitter.com/rmc47 (M0VFC)
https://twitter.com/ItinerantHam (M0IDA)

[ANS thanks Ohio/Penn DX Bulletin for the above information]

---------------------------------------------------------------------

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station Contact Opportunity

Call for Proposals
Proposal Window February 15 - April 15, 2017

The Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) Program is seeking formal and informal education institutions and organizations, individually or working together, to host an Amateur Radio contact with a crew member on board the ISS.  ARISS anticipates that the contact would be held between January 1, 2018 and June 30, 2018. Crew scheduling and ISS orbits will determine the exact contact dates. To maximize these radio contact opportunities, ARISS is looking
for organizations that will draw large numbers of participants and integrate the contact into a well-developed education plan.

The deadline to submit a proposal is April 15, 2017.  Proposal information and documents can be found at www.arrl.org/hosting-an-ariss-contact.

The Opportunity

Crew members aboard the International Space Station will participate in scheduled Amateur Radio contacts. These radio contacts are approximately 10 minutes in length and allow students to interact with the astronauts through a question-and-answer session.

An ARISS contact is a voice-only communication opportunity via Amateur Radio between astronauts and cosmonauts aboard the space station and classrooms and communities. ARISS contacts afford education audiences the opportunity to learn firsthand from astronauts what it is like to live and work in space and to learn about space research conducted on the ISS. Students also will have an opportunity to learn about satellite communication, wireless technology,  and radio science. Because of the nature of human spaceflight and the complexity of scheduling activities aboard the ISS, organizations must demonstrate flexibility to accommodate changes in dates and times of the radio contact.

Amateur Radio organizations around the world, NASA, and space agencies in Russia, Canada, Japan and Europe sponsor this educational opportunity by providing the equipment and operational support to enable direct communication between crew on the ISS and students around the world via Amateur Radio. In the US, the program is managed by AMSAT (Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation) and
ARRL (American Radio Relay League) in partnership with NASA and CASIS (Center for the Advancement of Science in Space).

More Information

Interested parties can find more information about the program at www.ariss.org and www.arrl.org/ARISS.

For proposal information and more details such as expectations, proposal guidelines and proposal form, and dates and times of Information Sessions go to http://www.arrl.org/hosting-an-ariss-contact.

Please direct any questions to ariss@arrl.org.

[ANS thanks Dave, AA4KN, for the above information]

---------------------------------------------------------------------

RadFXsat-2 Receives IARU Frequency Coordination

RadFXSat-2 is a 1U cubesat technology demonstration mission from Vanderbilt University that has been accepted for launch as part of NASA’s CubeSat Launch Initiative. Vanderbilt University is partnered with AMSAT, who will provide the satellite and communications for the experiments onboard as part of the AMSAT Fox program.

AMSAT recently received IARU frequency coordination for a 1200 baud BPSK telemetry downlink beacon on 435.750 MHz, and a mode V/u inverting transponder with an uplink of 145.860-145.890 MHz and a downlink of 435.760-435.790 MHz.

RadFXSat-2 is currently manifested as part of the ELaNA XX mission, scheduled for no earlier than December 2017, on a Virgin Galactic Launcher One, from Mojave, California. Other satellites on the mission include:

     CACTUS-1 – Capitol Technology University, Laurel, Md.
     ALBus – NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio
     SurfSat – University of Central Florida, Orlando, Fla.
     Q-PACE – University of Central Florida, Orlando, Fla.
     CAPE-3 – University of Louisiana Lafayette, La.
     MiTEE – University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich.
     PICS – Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah
     INCA – New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, N.M.
     MicroMas-2b – Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Lexington, Mass.
     EXOCUBE – California Polytechnic University, San Louis Obispo, Calif.
     PolarCube – University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, Colo.

[ANS thanks Drew, KO4MA, for the above information]

---------------------------------------------------------------------

14th Annual CubeSat Developers Workshop

The 14th Annual CubeSat Developers Workshop will be held in San Luis Obispo, CA April 26-28 2017.  The schedule is now on the workshop website at the link below.
http://www.cubesat.org/s/2017-Workshop-Schedule.pdf

REGISTRATION
Prices are as follows:
3 Day Pass + Banquet
Early Bird Professional - $375
Professional - $475
Student - $150

1 Day Pass
Early Bird Professional - $160
Professional - $200

Early bird registration ends on March 17, 2017 so be sure to register
before the
price goes up!

[ANS thanks the CubeSat Workshop Team for the above information]

---------------------------------------------------------------------

BY70-1 Re-entry

The 2U CubeSat BY70-1 was built by students from the Beijing Bayi High School and carried into a 524 x 212 km orbit on a CZ-2D rocket launched from the Taiyuan Space Launch Center on December 28, 2016.

On February 17, 2017, as the satellite started to burn up on its re-entry into the Earth’s atmosphere, this end of mission statement was posted on the school’s website.

Dear friends of BY70-1:

Satellite BY70-1 has completed all designed missions. For the amateurs who completed 2-way QSO using the repeater onboard, received effective satellite telemetry, or obtained satellite camera photos, we would like to invite you sending connection data package (audio or video evidence), satellite
telemetry data or photos received to Email: 6015@bayims.cn.

So that we can keep statistics records and deliver our appreciation toward you in public. We would be pleased to exchange QSL card for QSO users, and some souvenirs for the telemetry or camera photos users.

We hope more Amateur youth space program will be brought to you in the near future!

E-mail Address: 6015@bayims.cn

Post Address:  Mr Xiangming TAOBeijing Bayi School, 29# Suzhou Street, Haidian Dist, Beijing, China, P.O. 100080

[ANS thanks Beijing Bayi High School and AMSAT-UK for the above
information]

/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the President's Club. Members of the President's Club, as sustaining donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status. Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership information.

73,
This week's ANS Editor, Lee McLamb, KU4OS ku4os at amsat dot org

Two projects with AMSAT ties selected for NASA launches

Courtesy of AMSAT/KO4MA

Two cubesat missions with ties to AMSAT have been selected as part of the eighth round of the NASA CubeSat Launch Initiative. These spacecraft are eligible for placement on a launch manifest after final negotiations, depending on the availability of a flight opportunity.

TJREVERB is a cubesat from Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology, in Alexandria, Virginia. This satellite will include an AMSAT Fox mode U/v FM radio system, and will be capable of serving as an analog FM repeater.

HuskySat-1 from the University of Washington in Seattle will carry a mode V/u linear transponder and 1200 baud BPSK beacon similar to RadFXsat-2. The satellite will demonstrate plasma propulsion and high gain telemetry in advance of a larger cubesat lunar mission.

The complete list of satellites selected may be found at on the NASA web page. Further information will be shared when available.

RadFXsat-2 receives IARU frequency coordination

Courtesy of AMSAT-US and  
            
RadFXSat-2 is a 1U cubesat technology demonstration mission from Vanderbilt University that has been accepted for launch as part of NASA’s CubeSat Launch Initiative. Vanderbilt University is partnered with AMSAT, who will provide the satellite and communications for the experiments onboard as part of the AMSAT Fox program.

AMSAT recently received IARU frequency coordination for a 1200 baud BPSK telemetry downlink beacon on 435.750 MHz, and a mode V/u inverting transponder with an uplink of 145.860-145.890 MHz and a downlink of 435.760-435.790 MHz.

RadFXSat-2 is currently manifested as part of the ELaNA XX mission, scheduled for no earlier than December 2017, on a Virgin Galactic Launcher One, from Mojave, California. Other satellites on the mission include:
  • CACTUS-1 – Capitol Technology University, Laurel, Md.
  • ALBus – NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio
  • SurfSat – University of Central Florida, Orlando, Fla.
  • Q-PACE – University of Central Florida, Orlando, Fla.
  • CAPE-3 – University of Louisiana Lafayette, La.
  • MiTEE – University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich.
  • PICS – Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah
  • INCA – New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, N.M.
  • MicroMas-2b – Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Lexington, Mass.
  • EXOCUBE – California Polytechnic University, San Louis Obispo, Calif.
  • PolarCube – University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, Colo.

Saturday, February 18, 2017

BY70-1 is no more

Nico PA0DLO posted

BY70-1 re-entered today 2017-02-18 at 00:19 UTC +/- 3 minutes near 11 degrees South, 159 degrees West.


First amateur radio geosynchronous satellite to launch in 2017

From the KB6NU Ham Radio Blog

It was recently announced that researchers at the Ted and Karyn Hume Center for National Security and Technology, part of Virginia Tech University are preparing to send an amateur radio transponder into a geosynchronous orbit in 2017.

Seven days a week, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, a new ham band will be available for the Americas,” said Robert McGwier, N4HY, a research professor in the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and the Hume Center’s director of research. This would be the first amateur radio payload in a geosynchronous orbit, and would significantly enhance communications capabilities for amateur radio operators, in particular following natural disasters or other emergency situations.

Amateurs have, of course, been communicating via satellite for decades. The first Orbiting Satellites Carrying Amateur Radio, or OSCAR, satellites were launched in the 1960s. Until now, however, these satellites have been in low Earth orbit (LEO), and were only available for short times when they happened to be overhead.

A geosynchronous satellite, however, would be accessible 24 hours a day, seven days a week. A geosynchronous orbit has the same period as the Earth’s rotation — just under 24 hours. That makes them easy to locate and access, as they are almost always in the same spot in the sky. In this case, the satellite will always be within a band of longitudes over the Americas, continually accessible to any amateur radio operator there, including the students and researchers at the Virginia Tech Ground Station.

One expected application is emergency communications. This satellite will allow amateur radio operators to help emergency personnel reliably access supplies, logistical support, and medical assistance. They key is to ensure that the satellite would always be accessible to the radio operators — which is why the geosynchronous orbit is critical.

The satellite itself will be operated by Millennium Space Systems on behalf of the United States Air Force; the Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation, also known as AMSAT, will operate the radio, which will be designed and built by Virginia Tech students — making this project a unique collaboration among the university, nonprofit organizations, private companies, and the federal government.

The Hume Center team is also engineering a ground terminal that emergency personnel could use to relay their own existing communications channels through the satellite. This setup could be deployed through the American Radio Relay League and the Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation as a key part of a robust national emergency response system, allowing trained operators to reliably mobilize to disaster areas in the first critical hours after a devastating event.

Questions. I have questions.

I’ve taken most of this information from a press release on the Virginia Tech website. The press release raises nearly as many questions as it answers. For example:
  • What can I and other amateur radio operators do to support this effort?
  • What frequencies will this satellite use?
  • Will amateurs like you and me be able to build their own equipment to access this satellite?
  • If so, what kind of equipment will amateur radio operators need to communicate via this satellite?
I’ve e-mailed N4HY with these questions. I’ll follow up on this story when I have the answers. This will be an amazing addition to amateur radio, and I’m looking forward to it.
UPDATE: There is more information in the QRZ.Com at http://forums.qrz.com/index.php?threads/first-amateur-radio-in-geosynchronous-orbit.505312/, if you want to wade through some the usual baloney that these threads contain. I’ll do that myself and update this post later.

Gary Pearce KN4AQ says:
Here’s the presentation on the satellite from the 2016 ARRL/TAPR DCC. It’ll be a “Five & Dime” satellite (5 GHz up, 10 GHz down), with 1000 10 kHz wide all-digital channels.
https://youtu.be/BE6ZZ3MQsNY

Monday, February 13, 2017

Nayif-1 CubeSat with Amateur Radio Transponder Set to Launch on February 15

From ARRL

AMSAT-UK and AMSAT-NL have learned that MBRSC has released information about the launch date of the Nayif-1 satellite, which includes a full FUNcube communication package. Nayif-1 is set for launch on an Indian PSLV launch vehicle on February 15 at 0358 UTC. PSLV Flight C-37, will be carry more than 100 satellites into orbit. Nayif-1 carries a U/V linear Amateur Radio transponder for SSB and CW and a telemetry transmitter. The initial plan called for a late-2015 launch.

Nayif-1 was a joint project of the Mohammed bin Rashid Space Centre (MBRSC) and American University of Sharjah (AUS). The United Arab Emirate’s first nanosatellite, Nayif-1 was developed by Emirati engineering students from AUS under the supervision of a team of engineers and specialists from MBRSC. The partnership between the two entities was aimed at providing hands-on satellite-manufacturing experience to engineering students.

Telemetry will be transmitted on 145.940 MHz, 1.2 kb BPSK (FUNcube standard). The SSB/CW transponder uplink passband is 435.045-435.015 MHz, and the downlink passband is 145.960-145.990 MHz.

AMSAT-UK is seeking post-launch reports from stations around the world, especially during the first few minutes and hours after launch. It is anticipated that the first signals may be heard in North America during the mid-evening hours on February 14 (local time).

A mission-specific telemetry dashboard is available. In a manner similar to that of the FUNcube-1 dashboard, this one will be capable of uploading the telemetry received to a central data warehouse.
More information on the telemetry dashboard is available, as is a test file.

Initial spacecraft operation will be in a low-power “safe” mode, with just the telemetry transmitter activated.

Saturday, February 11, 2017

Amsat News Service ANS-043

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and information service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building, launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to: ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* SSTV From The ISS February 13-14
* K5T Grid Expedition to DL88jx
* Great STEM Lesson Idea
* Donations for AMSAT SA Kletskous CubeSat
* 2017 Teachers Institute Schedule Announced
* University CubeSat Opportunity
* Nayif-1 CubeSat Launch Announced
* Nayif-1 UPDATE Pre-launch Keps and more details
* UT1FG/MM QSL Procedure for this season
* Live HAMTV Video Planned for ARISS Contact
* ARISS News
* Satellite Shorts From All Over


SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-043.01
ANS-043 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 043.01
From AMSAT HQ KENSINGTON, MD.
February 12, 2017
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-043.01

SSTV From The ISS February 13-14

An MAI-75 Experiment SSTV event is planned to begin on Monday, Feb. 13 from 09:25-18:00 UTC and Tuesday, Feb. 14 from 11:25-16:30 UTC. The downlink frequency is expected to be 145.800 MHz and the transmission mode  is expected to be PD180. This opportunity should cover most of the world during the operational period.

The MAI-75 experiment uses a notebook computer on the ISS Russian Segment, which stores images that are then transmitted to Earth using the ham radio, specifically the onboard Kenwood TM D710E transceiver. Images received can be posted and viewed at https://ariss-sstv.blogspot.com/

Please note that the event, and any ARISS event, is dependent on other activities, schedules and crew responsibilities on the ISS and are subject to change at any time.

While preparations are being finalized please check for new and the most current information on the AMSAT.org and ARISS.org websites, the AMSAT-BB@amsat.org, the ARISS facebook at Amateur Radio On The International Space Station (ARISS) and ARISS twitter @ARISS_status for the latest information on this event.

[ANS thanks ARISS for the above information]

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K5T Grid Expedition to DL88jx

Several satellite operators will make their way down to the southernmost tip of Texas' "Big Bend" on Sunday, February 12, 2017. Operating from within Big Bend National Park's Talley Campground via
amateur satellites, grid chasers will have a shot at the elusive DL88jx for a period of roughly 18 hours.

Listen for K5T on FM and SSB satellites starting roughly at 21:00 UTC on February 12 through 15:00 UTC on February 13. ISS packet is possible but not planned. You may occasionally catch K5T in grid square DL89. Pass/schedule requests will not be honored on this trip. Some HF operation may occur.

Paper QSL with SASE via W5PFG or LoTW with the callsign "K5T."

[ANS thanks Clayton W5PFG for the above Information]

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Great STEM Lesson Idea

Dave Ryan, EI4HT/M0GIW, has posted an excellent video of a project he devised with his daught Erin. Dave and his daughter downloaded the list of questions for the ARISS QSO between Astronaut Shane Kimbrough and South Street School, Danbury, Connecticut USA. He and Erin researched the questions and made a list of projected answers for them. The contact was made with ON4ISS, an ARISS telebridge station in Belgium, and Erin and Dave were able to listen to the transmission live from from their QTH in South Yorkshire, UK. Dave videotaped the QSO and posted it online at:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MzQbyIH8Qwg

This is an excellent example of how to integrate Amateur Radio and the the ISS without being directly part of an ARISS contact. The examples can be used with any demo or within a planned classroom setting. This is a great example of how to introduce a STEM related activity and create an interest in the hobby at the same time.

[ANS thanks Dave EI4HT/M0GIW and Erin for the above information]

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Donations for AMSAT SA Kletskous CubeSat

Two companies, RS Components and Trax Interconnect, have made major contributions to AMSAT SA's Kletskous CubeSat.  RS Components have supplied components for the next generation Electronic Power Supply system (EPS) and the controller board.  Trax Interconnect supplied the PC Boards for the EPS, the controller board and the magnetic stabilization system.  Their support for amateur radio and amateur radio satellites is much appreciated.

[ANS thanks the SARL weekly news in English 2017-2-4 for the above  information]

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2017 Teachers Institute Schedule Announced

ARRL has announced the 2017 schedule for our Teachers Institute on Wireless Technology. We want you to be among the first to receive this information.  If you are an ARRL member you’ll see an article about the Teachers Institute in the March issue of QST.  You will also see an announcement in our next issue Radio Waves.

If you are a past participant of the Teachers Institute we hope that you have found many ways to use the ideas, training and resources you received and are interested in spreading the word to other teachers. You may want to consider signing up for the advanced TI-2 on Remote Sensing and Data Gathering.

You are probably in the best position to know where to circulate information about this opportunity within your school district.  A listing on your school or school district website?  A newsletter?   A
web page for science and technology teachers?  Word of mouth to teachers in your circle? We’d like to get the word out to reach teachers who can make use of this opportunity.

If you would like to receive copies of our printed brochures please send your request and your mailing address to etp@arrl.org.

Here’s some copy you can use to announce the opportunity in your school community:

Integrate STEM by Exploring Wireless Technology

ARRL, the national association for Amateur Radio, has just announced the schedule for two sessions of its Introductory Teachers Institute on Wireless Technology (TI-1) to be offered during the summer of 2017. The ARRL Teachers Institute is an expenses paid, intensive professional development opportunity for educators who want to receive training and resources to explore wireless technology in the classroom.  Topics at the TI-1 Introduction to Wireless Technology, include basic electronics, radio science, microcontroller programming and basic robotics.  ARRL will also offer an advanced Teachers Institute (TI-2) on Remote Sensing and Data Gathering. This linked article from the March issue of ARRL’s journal, QST, includes the schedule and description of offerings this summer.

Please visit the ARRL website at: www.arrl.org/ti for more details and to download an application. Watch this video for an inside look at the Teachers Institute! Application deadline is May 1.

[ANS thanks Debra K1DMJ and the ARRL for the above information]

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University CubeSat Opportunity

The UK Space Agency is encouraging university students to take advantage of a new opportunity to build and test their own CubeSats

The aim of the The Fly Your Satellite! program is to support university student teams with educational CubeSats throughout the assembly, integration, testing, and verification process. By
participating in the programme, students will implement standard practices for spacecraft development; receive support from experienced ESA specialists; attend tailored training courses; and
will be offered access to state-of-the-art test facilities.

ESA say only launch opportunities from the International Space Station (ISS) are envisioned, and CubeSat teams applying need to ensure that their mission complies with a deployment to orbit from
the ISS.

Further information at http://tinyurl.com/ANS043-UnivCubesats

UK Space Agency
https://twitter.com/spacegovuk

[ANS thanks ESA via Southgate ARN for the above information]

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Nayif-1 CubeSat Launch Announced

AMSAT-UK and AMSAT-NL are delighted to now be able to confirm that the Nayif-1 1U CubeSat, which has a full FUNcube payload, is now scheduled for launch on an Indian PSLV launch vehicle at 03:58 UT on February 15, 2017. The flight, C-37, will be carry a total of 104 satellites into orbit.

Nayif-1 has been developed by the Mohammed bin Rashid Space Centre (MBRSC) and American University of Sharjah (AUS). The UAE’s first Nanosatellite was developed by Emirati engineering students from AUS under the supervision of a team of engineers and specialists from MBRSC within the framework of a partnership between the two entities, aiming to provide hands-on experience to engineering students on satellite manufacturing.

The spacecraft includes a U/V linear transponder and telemetry transmitter. It employs enhanced oscillator circuitry and includes an active attitude determination and control system.

As with previous missions carrying FUNcube payloads, AMSAT-UK would very much like to receive as many reports from stations around the world, especially during the first few minutes and hours after launch. We expect that the first signals may be heard in North America during the mid evening hours (local time) on Feb 14.

There is a mission specific Telemetry Dashboard for this project and this can be downloaded from:

http://download.funcube.org.uk/Nayif-1_Dashboard_1038_installer.msi

and, in a similar way to the FUNcube-1 Dashboard, this will be capable of uploading the telemetry received to a central Data Warehouse.

Guidance Notes for the installation of the Dashboard, integration with a FUNcube Dongle and the Data Warehouse have been prepared for the Nayif-1 mission. These can be downloaded from:

http://tinyurl.com/ANS043-Nayif-1-Dashboard

A file to test that the Dashboard and Warehouse configuration are working correctly can be downloaded from: http://download.funcube.org.uk/nayif1_testfile.funcubebin

The operating frequencies for the spacecraft will be:

Telemetry  145.940 MHz using 1k2 BPSK to the FUNcube standard.

SSB/CW Transponder  Uplink on 435.045 – 435.015 MHz  Downlink on 145.960 – 145.990 MHz

Initial operations of the spacecraft will be in a low power “safe” mode where only the telemetry transmitter is activated.

More details about the launch, exact deployment time and pre-launch TLE’s will be made available as soon as they become available; in the meantime we will really appreciate your support!

[ANS thanks AMSAT-UK for the above information]

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Nayif-1 UPDATE Pre-launch Keps and more details

The launch time for the Nayif-1 CubeSat has been confirmed as 03:58UTC on February 15th 2017 on the PSLV C37 vehicle and a set of pre-launch TLEs have now been released:

NAYIF

1 17002U 17002A   17046.17824931 0.00000000  00000-0  00000-0 0  9993
2 17002  97.5521 107.5843 0004848 278.6481 296.8511 15.21991390    01

This file can also been downloaded from here http://download.funcube.org.uk/nayif_tle.txt

We expect that the FUNcube transmitter on Nayif-1 will activate at approximately 05:06UTC, but the exact timing is still to be confirmed!  Initial transmissions will be in “safe” mode and will be
of the 1k2 BPSK telemetry only with approx 50mW of RF power. If the predictions are correct, the spacecraft will be heading north over Mexico and the western parts of the US and Canada.

During the Launch and Early Operation phase (LEOP) of the mission, the Nayif-1 command team will be headquartered at the American University of Sharjah Ground station in the United Arab Emirates. They will obviously be especially keen to have all possible reports of signal reception during this first orbit! To encourage everyone to take part, there will be a small prize for the station that submits the first data to the Nayif-1 Data Warehouse and perhaps an extra reward if they manage to receive the very first frame transmitted by the spacecraft! This should have the sequence number 5471 or 5472.

Details of the Nayif-1 frequencies, together with details of how to the download the Dashboard can be found here

https://funcube.org.uk/2017/02/08/nayif-1-launch-date-now-confirmed/

The Data Warehouse is still under final development but a preview can be seen here: http://data.amsat-uk.org/nayif1/index

Please note that if you are already a registered user of the FUNcube Dashboard then you do not need to re-register. Your existing details will transfer automatically to the new Dashboard when you run it for the first time.

If you run the test file with the Nayif-1 Dashboard please do not expect the Warehouse to show the data - it is from an earlier date than that is already displayed. However the “packets uploaded” tab at
the bottom right corner of your Dashboard will show that the files have uploaded OK, that all is well with your system and that it is ready for action.

We are hoping that the actual launch will be webstreamed and details of this will be made available as soon as possible.  The AMSAT-UK and -NL team will also be using the #funcube IRC channel
on launch day and you will be very welcome to join them there. If you do not have the Dashboard available then please submit your heard reports here. A web client can be found at http://irc.lc/freenode/funcube if you do not have an IRC client installed.

[ANS thanks Graham G3VZV for the above information]

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UT1FG/MM QSL Procedure for this season

As you may know Yuri, UT1FG, prefers to do his own QSLs to the extent possible.  He has asked me to help funnel QSL requests to him while he is at sea so that he can process them and mail them from
ports as he travels. Yuri does not process qsl requests when he is not on a ship.

The following procedure only applies to contacts made during this season from the M/V Chestnut. Previous seasons will be handled by his manager Eugene, UX0FY.  Eugene has all the logs for previous seasons and can be contacted through his qrz.com email address.  Please contact Eugene before sending anything in the mail to him and ask for instructions on how to proceed.

You may prepare a logsheet of QSO's that Yuri can print, verify, sign and mail from one of his destination ports.  An example of a suitable logsheet can be found at papays.com/sat under the UT1FG/MM QSL Instructions link at the top of the page.

Please use the following conventions when preparing the logsheet:

1.  List only one contact per grid.
2.  Only request confirmations of NEW Grids.
3.  Use Excel or a similar program to create the logsheet.
4.  Save the Logsheet to a .pdf  If your program cannot     save to a .pdf, download a free program like Bullzip that will install a .pdf printer that you can print to and create a .pdf file.
5.  Each page should stand alone; there should be a place for Yuri's signature on each page.
6.  Incude your COMPLETE Mailing Address on each page.
7.  Name the logsheet file with this format: Yourcall_UT1FG_DateLastQSO for example:  DJ8MS_UT1FG_10Feb2017.pdf
8.  Email your file as an attachment to: k8yse at papays.com with the subject line the same as the .pdf file name:  DJ8MS_UT1FG_10Feb2017
10. Please be sure to follow the example on the website papays.com/sat/ut1fgqsl.html  Consistency   will help Yuri process requests more efficiently.
11. If there are qso's on your list that are not in the log, Yuri will draw a line through them and initial.

I will send an acknowledgement email when I receive a request.  This way you will know that Yuri will have your logsheet.

If Yuri tells me that he has mailed your logsheet, I will post that information on the bulletin boards.

Yuri's time when nearing or in port is very limited. He has a lot of responsibilities to carry out and large amounts of paper to process along with requests from his Company.  He has more time when he is sailing. Let that guide you when deciding when you email your requests.  A good time to mail  your request is when Yuri is about 5 days from making port.  Follow him at marinetraffic.com (M/V Chestnut - bulk Cargo).

This new procedure may be changed or stopped depending on how it goes.  Hopefully this will work well and Yuri will find it acceptable.

We are very fortunate that Yuri operates from so many water grids that otherwise would never be on the satellites.  His passion for satellites is amazing. Have fun working him.

[ANS thanks John K8YSE for the above information]

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Live HAMTV Video Planned for ARISS Contact

The HAMTV experiment is planned transmit live video during the ARISS contact with Collège André Malraux, Chatelaillon-Plage, France on Mon 2017-02-13 14:00:35 UTC.

The HAMTV video downlink is on 2395 MHz (DVB-S,SR2000,fec 1/2, PID video 256, PID audio 257, Mp eg2 codec). Audio will be on 70cm.

The video will be streamed on-line at: https://hamtv.batc.tv/live/

Additional streaming from other ground stations will be at: http://www.batc.tv/iss/

[ANS thanks Jean-Pierre, F6DZP and the HAMTV yahoogroups e-mail list for the above information]

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ARISS News

+ A Successful contact was made between Space Exploration Educators
  Conference, Houston, Texas, and Astronaut Thomas Pesquet KG5FYG
  using Callsign NA1SS. The contact began Thu 2017-02-09 20:30:10 UTC
  and lasted about nine and a half minutes. Contact was Telebridge via
  K6DUE. ARISS Mentor was Frank KA3HDO.

+ A Successful contact was made between Palmetto Scholars Academy,
  North Charleston, SC, USA and Astronaut Shane Kimbrough KE5HOD using
  Callsign NA1SS. The contact began Fri 2017-02-10 17:59:18 UTC and
  lasted about nine and a half minutes. Contact was direct via K4PSA.
  ARISS Mentor was John K4SQC.

Upcoming ARISS Contact Schedule

Collège André Malraux, Chatelaillon-Plage, France, direct via F4KJT
The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be FXØISS
The scheduled  astronaut is Thomas Pesquet KG5FYG
Contact is a go for: Mon 2017-02-13  14:00:35 UTC

3rd Junior High School, Komotini, Greece,  direct via SV7APQ
The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be OR4ISS
The scheduled astronaut is Shane Kimbrough KE5HOD
Contact is a go for:  Fri 2017-02-17 08:58:11 UTC

[ANS thanks ARISS, Charlie AJ9N and David AA4KN for the above
 information]

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Satellite Shorts From All Over

+ The Smallsat Launcher War

  "Over the last decade or so the definition of what a ‘small
  satellite’ is has ballooned beyond the original cubesat design
  specification to satellites of 50 or 100 kg. Today a ‘smallsat’ is
  defined far more around the cost, and sometimes the technologies
  used, than the size and shape of the box that goes into orbit."

  Read the full story at:
  http://hackaday.com/2017/02/09/the-smallsat-launcher-war/

  [ANS thanks Hackaday.com for the above information and Bernhard
   VA6BMJ for bringing it to our attention]

+ NASA seeks partnerships with US companies to advance commercial
  space technologies

  NASA is seeking partnerships with U.S. companies focused on
  industry-developed space technologies that can advance the
  commercial space sector and benefit future NASA missions through
  the "Announcement of Collaborative Opportunity (ACO)" solicitation
  released by NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD).

  Read complete story at:
  http://tinyurl.com/ANS043-NASAPartners

  [ANS thanks spacedaily.com for the above information]

+ Smallsat Builders Admit a Little Bigger Might Be a Little Better

  "What’s the perfect size for a small satellite? “The answer is 42
  kilograms,” said Martin Sweeting, Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd.
  founder and executive chairman, at the Small Satellite
  Symposium Feb. 7 and 8."

  See more at:
  http://tinyurl.com/ANS043-SmallSatBuilders

  [ANS thanks SpaceNews for the above information]

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/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the President's Club. Members of the President's Club, as sustaining donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status. Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership information.

73,
This week's ANS Editor,
EMike McCardel, AA8EM
aa8em at amsat dot org

Saturday, February 04, 2017

AMSAT News Service ANS-036

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and information service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building, launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to: ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* AMSAT-NA and M2 Antenna Systems LEO-Pack Back in Stock in AMSAT Store
* New Distance Record Set for ISS Packet QSO
* QB50 Mission – Downlink Frequency Details
* AMSAT Events
* ARISS News
* Satellite Shorts from All Over

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-036.01
ANS-036 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 036.01
 >From AMSAT HQ KENSINGTON, MD.
DATE Febuary 5, 2017
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-036.01

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AMSAT-NA and M2 Antenna Systems LEO-Pack Back in Stock in AMSAT Store

AMSAT-NA and M2 Antenna Systems are pleased to announce that the LEO-Pack system is being offered to members only at $499, shipping included (US only).Non-members can join AMSAT-NA at time of purchase to participate in this special purchase.

The LEO-Pack will then be drop shipped to the purchaser from M2, who estimates that the production time after the order is received will be 2-3 weeks.

The 436CP16 and 2MCP8A are light weight, circularly polarized antennas optimized for Low Earth Orbit (LEO) Satellite communications or other applications where a small circular polarized antenna is required. Optimummatch and gain designed for the satellite band.

Rear mounted for easy coaxial cable routing. A preamp (not included) can be mounted close to the antenna for almost no coax loss before the preamp, maximizing your receive performance.

See all the details, including links to technical specifications at:

http://store.amsat.org/catalog/product_info.php?cPath=1&products_id=123


[ANS thanks the guys in the AMSAT On-Line Store for the above information]

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New Distance Record Set for ISS Packet QSO

Congratulations to Mark Pisani, KK6OTJ, and Jerry Rogers, W8LR, for
their February 1 APRS message packet QSO during an ISS pass. The
distance was 3,089 km, establishing a new distance record for the ISS
digipeater.


[ANS thanks Mark, KK6OTJ for the above information]

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QB50 Mission – Downlink Frequency Details


The first of the QB50 CubeSats that are destined for deployment from the International Space Station are now awaiting their turn to be uplifted to the ISS.

In addition to the ISS deployments it is planned that there will be two further batches launched using other vehicles.

The exact timing of these events is not yet available but, in advance, here is a fully updated list of all CubeSats involved. Also included are the details of their science experiments and their downlink frequencies and modulation modes. The frequencies have been coordinated by the IARU Frequency Coordination team and, generally, all the spacecraft will use 9k6 data rates on 70cms.

Download the QB50 Frequency Excel Spreadsheet – http://tinyurl.com/QB50-Frequencies-20170201


[ANS thanks AMSAT-UK for the above information]

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AMSAT Events

Information about AMSAT activities at other important events around the country.  Examples of these events are radio club meetings where AMSAT Area Coordinators give presentations, demonstrations of working amateur satellites, and hamfests with an AMSAT presence (a table with
AMSAT literature and merchandise, sometimes also with presentations, forums, and/or demonstrations).

*Saturday, 4 February 2017 – Palm Springs Hamfest in Palm Springs CA

*Friday-Sunday, 10-12 February 2017   Orlando HamCation in Orlando, FL

*Friday and Saturday, 17-18 February 2017 – Yuma Hamfest in Yuma AZ

*Saturday, 18 March 2017 – Scottsdale SpringFest in Scottsdale AZ

*Friday through Sunday, 31 March–2 April 2017, NVCON in Las Vegas NV

*Wednesday, 5 April 2007 – presentation for Scottsdale Amateur Radio Club in Scottsdale AZ

*Friday and Saturday, 7-8 April 2017, Green Country Hamfest in Claremore OK

*Saturday, 6 May 2017 – Cochise Amateur Radio Association Hamfest in Sierra Vista AZ

*Friday and Saturday, 9-10 June 2017, HAM-COM in Irving TX

*Saturday, 10 June 2017 – Prescott Hamfest in Prescott AZ


[ANS thanks AMSAT-NA for the above information]

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ARISS News

Successful Contacts

*  A telebridge contact with students at Cours Saint Maur, Monaco,
was successful Thu 2017-02-02.

*  A telebridge contact via ON4ISS with students at the South Street
School and Westside Middle School in Danbury CT, USA, was successful
Thu 2017-02-02.

*  A telebridge contact via W6SRJ with students at the Swiss Space
Center – École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne,  Lausanne,
Switzerland was successful Thu 2017-01-26.

Upcoming Contacts

*  A telebridge contact via K6DUE at the Space Exploration Educators
Conference, Houston, Texas, is scheduled for Thu 2017-02-09 20:30:10 UTC 21
deg. The scheduled astronaut is Thomas Pesquet, KG5FYG.


The Manned Space Flight Education Foundation Inc. is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit educational foundation offering extensive science education program and  a space museum. It is the Official Visitor Center of NASA Johnson Space Center  and the only Smithsonian Affiliate in the greater Houston area. Educational  emphasis is placed on science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) in a
fun and engaging way. It uses space exploration to inspire wonder and interest in science and math.

Space Center Houston offers a rich array of education programming for teachers and students, providing extraordinary learning opportunities. Inspiring young people to choose careers in STEM is one of the outcomes  of our program. Education programs are based on data-supported evidence of
effective learning and teaching methods.

This specific contact will be taking place during the Space Exploration Educator Conference, which engages teachers from around the world for three days of hands-on learning and exceptional keynote speakers. Students  from the Science Magnet Program at the Seabrook Intermediate School in Seabrook,  Texas will be participating in the Amateur Radio on the International Space  Station
(ARISS) contact.

Seabrook Intermediate School is the leader in innovative education. Their mission is to ensure that each individual explores and discovers unique talents, passions, and abilities through a dynamic system distinguished by limitless opportunities (including the Science Magnet Program) that foster
collaboration, creativity, intrinsic motivation, respect for diversity, and citizenship to develop a productive role in society.

The Science Magnet Program at Seabrook Intermediate School is offered to students in grades 6-8. The school provides a unique science curriculum for all students while providing additional science electives and opportunities for students enrolled in the Science Magnet Program.


*  A direct contact via K4PSA with students at the Palmetto Scholars Academy, North Charleston, SC, is scheduled for Fri 2017-02-10 17:59:18 UTC 38  deg. The scheduled astronaut is Shane Kimbrough, KE5HOD.

Palmetto Scholars Academy is a public charter school, providing a gifted curriculum to students in grades 6-12 in North Charleston, South Carolina. 6 years ago PSA opened in a converted day care center and was the lowest funded school in America. It was started by a group of concerned parents who wanted tomeet the needs of gifted students. In those early days, board members took out
second mortgages to meet teacher payroll, and parents pulled together daily to send in supplies. Despite challenges, PSA rose above the decrepitude and started its tradition of achievement, earning their mascot name of Phoenix.

PSA is a student haven for gifted students. “It’s okay to be a nerd  here” and “It’s cool to be smart” illuminate the student culture at PSA.

To meet the intellectual needs of gifted students, PSA participates in many challenges such as VEX Robotics, VEX IQ Robotics, FIRST Robotics Competition, Ham Radio, Lowcountry Science Fair, Odyssey of the Mind, and the Student Spaceflight Experiments Program (SSEP). PSA students have designed three experiments through the SSEP. Two experiments reached the ISS and  returned to
Earth, although the second experiment blew up on the Orb-3 and Falcon 9. The third experiment launches next month. Students also send experiments via PongSats, Cubes in Space, and student-launched high- altitude balloons.

PSA has a Ham Radio Club and their own vanity call sign, K4PSA. The club meets
every other Friday for 1 ½ hours and after schools on Friday. Since its inception in 2015, the club has gotten 6 students licensed for ham radio. These students will be the student liaisons and leaders for this ham radio contact.

PSA has established itself as a distinguished charter school in South Carolina. With a new building, better funding, and culture of  achievement, PSA rises from the ashes like the Phoenix and challenges its students to reach the stars.

Watch
http://www.ariss.org/upcoming-contacts.html
for information about upcoming contacts as they are scheduled.


[ANS thanks ARISS and Charlie, AJ9N for the above information]

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Satellite Shorts From All Over

Space Launch System Video Series -- "No Small Steps"

The challenge of going to Mars is monumental, and it's going to take a monumental rocket to make it possible. NASA's Space Launch System will be the most powerful rocket ever built and will help send humans to deep space destinations. SLS is an advanced, heavy-lift launch vehicle that will
provide an entirely new capability for science and human exploration beyond Earth's orbit.

Learn more about the Space Launch System with the "No Small Steps" video series. Hosted by Stephen Granade, the entertaining and informative series gets into the "how" of making a trip to Mars happen -- taking rocket science and making it relatable.

Episode 1: "Getting to Mars"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TOYXa9jx-TI

Episode 2: "A Foundation for Mars"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DesBgDPR22Q

Episode 3: "Rocket Fuel"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zJXQQv9UZNg

Episode 4: "Working With Gravity"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4wlcFU1Le4U

[ANS thanks NASA Education Express Message -- Feb. 2, 2017 for the above information]


DC Area Free Amateur Radio Technician License Class starting Sunday, March 26, 2017

The Montgomery Amateur Radio Club is offering a free amateur radio Technician license class at the Rockville Memorial Library for six Sundays on March 26, April 2, April 9, April 23, April 30, May 7, 2017 from 1:30 PM to 4:30 PM.  More information about this class is at

http://www.marcclub.org/mweb/education/classes/index.html

We will be meeting at the Studio i Makerspace Rockville Memorial Library, second floor
21 Maryland Ave Rockville, MD 20850

Maps & Directions
http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&source=s_q&hl=en&geocode=&q=21+Maryland+Ave
+Rockville+MD+20850+United+States

This is a great opportunity for you to get your amateur radio license.  To learn more about amateur radio, also known as ham radio, go to http://www.arrl.org/what-is-ham-radio

or watch the Discovering Amateur Radio video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bcfJUjcSEz8

You can register for this free class by sending an email to education@marcclub.org

[ANS thanks David Bern, W2LNX, MARC Education committee for the above information]

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/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the President's Club. Members of the President's Club, as sustaining donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status. Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership information.

73,
This week's ANS Editor, Joe Spier, K6WAO k6wao at amsat dot org

--
-73
k6wao Joe Spier k6wao@amsat.net
AMSAT Vice President, Educational Relations
AMSAT News Service Co-Editor

_______________________________________________
ANS-editor mailing list
ANS-editor@amsat.org
http://www.amsat.org/mailman/listinfo/ans-editor


Saturday, January 28, 2017

AMSAT News Service ANS-029

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and information service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building, launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to: ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* Colloquium Videos for 2009-2012 Posted on YouTube
* ARRL LoTW Adds Additional Satellite Entries
* Upcoming ARISS Contact Schedule as of 2017-01-27
* Get Your Iridium Fix Before It’s Too Late!

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-029.01
ANS-029 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 029.01
  From AMSAT HQ KENSINGTON, MD.
DATE January 29, 2017
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-029.01

Colloquium Videos for 2009-2012 Posted on YouTube

AMSAT-UK reports that thanks to Wouter Weggelaar PA3WEG and @BATC online videos
of talks given at AMSAT-UK Colloquium 2009-2012 are now posted at https://www.youtube.com/user/AMSATUK/videos

The videos were made by members of the British Amateur Television Club (BATC) and stored on the club’s streaming site. Dedicated BATC members have carried out the world-wide streaming and recording of the  AMSAT-UK International Space Colloquium since 2007.

[ANS thanks AMSAT-UK for the above information]

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ARRL LoTW Adds Additional Satellite Entries

ARRL LoTW/IT staff announce an update release containing additions and  changes made since the release of config.xml 10.4

The changes in config.xml 10.5 are:

     - In the Satellite enumeration, added entries for:
       - "BY70-1": Bayi Kepu Weixing 1
       - "IO-86": Indonesia-OSCAR 86 (LAPAN-ORARI)
       - "SAREX" for 2-way contacts made using the Shuttle Amateur Radio Experiment (SAREX)
            packet digipeater
       - "MIREX": for 2-way contacts made using the Mir packet digipeater

  [ANS thanks Sean, KX9X, for the above information]

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Upcoming ARISS Contact Schedule as of 2017-01-27

Cours Saint Maur, Monaco, Monaco, telebridge via LU1CGB The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be NA1SS The scheduled  astronaut is Thomas Pesquet KG5FYG Contact is a go for: Thu 2017-02-02  08:38:27 UTC 75 deg via LU1CGB Rescheduled due to Service Module spatial constraint.

South Street School, Danbury CT,  telebridge via ON4ISS The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be  OR4ISS The scheduled astronaut is Shane Kimbrough KE5HOD Contact is  a go for: Thu 2017-02-02 18:49:14 UTC 80 deg

[ANS thanks Charlie, AJ9N, for the above information]

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Get Your Iridium Fix Before It’s Too Late!

The shock and dazzle of Iridium flares will soon be a thing of the past.  Here's how to make the most of seeing them before a new generation of spacecraft replaces the Iridium satellites.

Each of the approximately 66 Iridiums in orbit have three door-sized aluminum antennae treated with highly reflective, silver-coated Teflon for temperature control.

When the angle between observer and satellite is just right, sunlight reflecting off an antenna can cause the satellite to surge from invisibility up to magnitude –8.5 in a matter of seconds. If you've never seen one, the searing brilliance may make you recoil instinctively. On rare occasions, flares can
reach magnitude –9.5. That's 100 times brighter than Venus!

Sadly, that era will soon draw to a close. On January 14th, SpaceX’s  Falcon 9 delivered the first 10 of a new generation of Iridium NEXT satellites to low-Earth orbit, starting the process to replace the older units in a maneuver called slot-swapping. While the new birds will provide faster data rates and
enhanced global communications, their antenna design is completely different and not expected to produce significant flares.

Heavens Above is one of the easiest sites to get you looking in the right place at the right time. The Heavens Above website allows for easy figuring and finding of Iridium flares.

Just sign in and give it your location, then click the Iridium Flares link under the Satellites heading on the left side of the homepage. A table will pop open with a week's worth of passes that includes pertinent information like brightness, altitude, and magnitude of the flare at flare center, the
brightest possible magnitude for a particular pass. Clicking on the date will  produce a
map showing the flare's path and ground track where the flare will appear brightest. When that path passes near or over your location, you'll see a –8 dazzler. If not, you can use the map to drive to the sweet spot and  await the display.

The transition to the Iridium NEXT generation will be gradual but certain, so make the most of the opportunities that remain. If you're a teacher, do your homework and plan an outing to show a daytime flare to your science class. Anything that gets people talking more about the sky is a good thing, and I guarantee those kids will never forget the sight.

[ANS thanks Bob King, and Sky and Telescope for the above information]

/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the President's Club. Members of the President's Club, as sustaining donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status. Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership information.

73,
This week's ANS Editor, Lee McLamb, KU4OS ku4os at amsat dot org

_______________________________________________
Via the ANS mailing list courtesy of AMSAT-NA
http://www.amsat.org/mailman/listinfo/ans